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2 Corinthians
Chapter 7


Theme: God's comfort in the heart of Paul

This is the last chapter on the comfort of God, and here it is God's comfort in the very heart of Paul. It is a very personal and wonderful chapter.

We need to remember that there had been a man in the church in Corinth who had been guilty of gross immorality (1 Cor.5). He had had an incestuous and adulterous relationship with his own father's wife, his stepmother. The church did not do anything to right the sinful situation, and Paul had rebuked them in his first Letter, telling them that they must deal with the problem. As Paul is writing his second letter to them, they had dealt with this sinner, and he repented and confessed his sin. The church had been right in dealing with him. Paul's letter had had the right kind of effect. Titus came to Paul with the report that this man had been weeping over his sin and that he felt utterly unworthy of further recognition by the church. It is to this matter that Paul is here referring.
The first verse of chapter 7 seems to me to belong to chapter 6, and should be there instead. It is an appeal made in view of the promises there referred to, to make every effort to obtain perfect purity, and to become entirely holy.


Paul Urges the Corinthians to Purity of Life (2 Cor.7:1-4)


2 Cor.7:1 Having therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God. (KJV)
Having therefore these promises . . . what promises is Paul talking about? The promises in 2 Cor.6:17-18 . . . the Promise that God would be a Father, a Protector, and a Friend. We have a Promise that God would dwell in us, that He would be our God. This does not mean that if we do not come out and be separate, we will lose our salvation. It is my humble opinion that IF a person is truly saved, they are saved FOREVER! It does mean that if we do not lead a clean and right life, God cannot nor will not bless us as He would like to do, but instead chastise us (Ps.73:14; 89:32; 118:18; Pro.15:10; Heb.12:5-11)
See OSAS: http://www.hisservants.org/once_saved,_always_saved_h_s.htm
Many people do not know just what a wonderful heavenly Father we have. People simply do not give Him a chance to be a real Father to us. Can we do something to change that?
Dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves, from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit . . . HOW can we cleanse ourselves? We cannot cleanse our conscience from the guilt of sin; we cannot wash out the stain of a guilty conscience . . . BUT, God has done that through the death of Christ and the shedding of His precious Blood on the cross. After we have been cleansed from our sins by the Blood of Christ, we still need a daily cleansing from the contamination of each day. When we receive the Word in faith (Rom.5:1; Eph.2:8-9; 1 Jn.5:4), and act upon that Word, we are cleansed from all the filthiness of the flesh and spirit. This is what the Lord Jesus meant when He said, Sanctify them through thy truth: thy word is truth (Jn.17:17). The Word of God is the best soap in the world! Paul says we are to cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and of the spirit. ALL sin is FILTH in the eyes of God. SO . . . what is the difference between the sins of the flesh and the sins of the spirit?
From all filthiness of the flesh . . . clearly means, the lustful and corrupt appetites and passions of the body, including all such actions of all kinds as are inconsistent with the virtue and purity with which the body, regarded as the temple of the Holy Ghost, should be kept holy. This would be all such passions and appetites that the Holy Spirit of God would NOT produce.
By filthiness of the spirit . . .  Paul most likely means all the thoughts or mental suggestions that defile the man. Mat.15:19 For out of the heart proceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, blasphemies: (KJV) . . . Jesus speaks of evil thoughts, as proceeding out of the heart, and which pollute the man. Possibly Paul here includes all the sins and passions which relate especially to mind or to the soul rather than to carnal appetites, such as the desire of revenge, pride, avarice, ambition, etc. These are in themselves just as polluting and defiling as the evil sensual pleasures. They stand just as much in the way of sanctification, and they are just as offensive to God, and they prove just as sure that the heart is depraved, as the ungodly sensual passions. The main difference is, that they are more decent in the external appearance; they can be better concealed; they are usually indulged by a more elevated class in society; but they certainly are NOT any less offensive to God. It may be added, also, that both these filths are often united in the same person; and that the man who is defiled in his spirit is often a man most corrupt and sensual in his flesh. When sin is allowed, it sweeps ln with a destructive influence through the whole frame; and usually leaves no part untouched, although some part may be more deeply corrupted than others.
Perfecting holiness in the fear of God . . . perfecting properly means to bring to an end, to finish, to complete. The idea here is, that of carrying it out to the completion. Holiness had been started in the heart; and the appeal of Paul is, that they should make every effort that it might be complete in all its parts. He does not say that this work of perfection had ever been accomplished nor does he say that it had not been. Paul only urges them to make every effort to do all they can to be completely holy. It is a responsibility that results from the nature of the law of God, and His unchanging claim on the eternal soul. The fact that no one has ever been perfect (except Jesus), does not lesson our duty to live right and perfect holiness.
No one is a friend of God who can remain in a state of sin, and who is satisfied and contented that he is not as holy as God is holy (1 Pet.1:16). Anyone who has no desire to be perfect as God is holy, and who does not make it his daily and constant aim to be as perfect as God, is NOT a TRUE Christian.
Jesus, perfect, sinless: (Isa.53:9; Mat.27:4,19,23-24; Jn.8:46; Lk.23:41,47; 2 Cor.5:21; Heb.4:15; 7:26-27; 1 Pet.2;22; 1 Jn.2:1; 3:5).

Six conditions of the Promises
#1. Be not unequally yoked with unbelievers (2 Cor.6:14-16).
#2. Come out from among them (2 Cor.6:17).
#3. Be separate from them (2 Cor.6:17).
#4. Touch not the unclean thing (2 Cor.6:17).
#5. Cleanse self of all filthiness of the flesh and spirit (2 Cor.7:1; Mk.7:19-21; Rom.1:18-32; 1 Cor.6:9-11; Gal.5:19-21; Col.3:5-10).
#6. Perfect holiness in the fear of God (2 Cor.7:1; Eph.1:4; 4:24; Gal.5:24; Rom.6:14-23; 8:1-13; Heb12:12-15).

2 Cor.7:2 Receive us; we have wronged no man, we have corrupted no man, we have defrauded no man. (KJV)
Receive us .  . . understand us. Receive properly means give space, place, or room; and here it clearly seems to mean, make room for us in your affections, receive us as your friends. It is an earnest plea that they would do what he had urged them to do in (2 Cor.6:13). From that he had strayed in the close of the last chapter. But, he here returns to the subject, and pleads for an interest in their affections and their love.
We have wronged no man . . . we (Paul and his co-workers) have done no injustice to man. This is given as a reason why they should admit him into their full confidence and affection. It is not unlikely that he had  been charged with injuring the incestuous person by the severe discipline which he having found necessary to inflict on him (1 Cor.5:5). This charge would no doubt be brought against him by the false teachers in Corinth. But Paul here says, that whatever the severity of the discipline was, he was not aware of having done injury to any member of that church. It is possible, that Paul does not refer here to any such charge, but that he says in  general that he had done no injury, and that there was no reason why they should not receive him to their confidence. For Paul, who had spent considerable time with others, to be able to say that he had wronged no man in any way . . . he could not have made this solemn declaration unless he was certain he had lived a very blameless life (Acts 20:33).
We have corrupted no man . . . this means that they had corrupted no man in his morals, either by their teaching or by their example. The word corrupt means, in general, to bring into a worse state or condition, and is very often applied to morals. The idea is, here, that Paul had not corrupted the principles or the habits, or led anyone into sin.
We have defrauded no man . . . we have taken no man's property, not by cunning, nor trick or deception. The word defraud literally means to have more than another, and then to take advantage of another, to seek unlawful gain, to defraud or to deceive. Paul had taken advantage of NO circumstance to extort money from them or to cheat them in any way. Paul knew that he had lived honestly, and could appeal to them all, that his life among them had been blameless.

Paul wanted them to open their hearts to them (2 Cor.6:11-12), and gives the 3 reasons:
#1. We have wronged no man in judgment. #2, We have corrupted no man in doctrine. And #3.
We have defrauded no man of property.

Their false teachers had beguiled (lured) the Corinthians from the simple truth of the Gospel, and corrupted their minds (2 Cor.11:3). They had brought them into bondage and exalted themselves, and they suffer for it (2 Cor.11:12-15,20). Paul is telling them, warning them, to open their eyes so that they could see (2 Cor.7:2-3).

2 Cor.7:3 I speak not this to condemn you: for I have said before, that ye are in our hearts to die and live with you. (KJV)

I speak not this to condemn you . . . Paul tells them that he does not speak this with any desire to rebuke them. In excusing myself, I do not accuse you, as though you suspected me of such things or as though you were guilty of such things; for I speak only of the false apostles.  
For I have said before. (2 Cor.6:11-12; Phil.1:7).
That ye are in our hearts . . . we are very devoted to you, you have a place in our hearts.
To die and live with you . . . Paul had told them that he was ready to die and live with you and for you (Phil.1:7,20,24; 2:17-18; Jn.10:11).

2 Cor.7:4 Great is my boldness of speech toward you, great is my glorying of you: I am filled with comfort, I am exceeding joyful in all our tribulation. (KJV)

Great is my boldness of speech toward you . . . boldness of speech (2 Cor.6:11), this verse seems designed to soften the seeming harshness of what he had said in (2 Cor.6:12), when he intimated that there was a lack of love in them towards him. He says that he speaks freely; he speaks as a friend; he speaks with the utmost openness and frankness; he conceals nothing from them. Paul speaks freely of their faults, and he speaks freely of his love to them; and he just as freely commends them and praises them. It is in the open, in the language of a friend, and he throws open wide his whole soul, concealing nothing.
Great is my glorying of you . . . I have great reason to commend and praise you, and I do it freely. He refers here to the fact that he had boasted of their generosity in regard to the proposed collection for the poor saints of Judea (2 Cor.9:4), that he had formerly boasted much of them to Titus, and of their readiness to obey his commands (verse 14), and that now he had had abundant evidence, by what he had heard from Titus (verse 5), that they were willing to yield to his commands, and obey his bans. He probably often had had occasion to boast of their favorable regard for him.
I am filled with comfort . . . by the evidence which I have received of your readiness to obey my commands. Filled with comfort, at the report of Titus (2 Cor. 1:4; 7:6,7,9,13). 
I am exceeding joyful . . . I am overjoyed (verses 7,9,16). The word here used occurs nowhere else in the New Testament except in (Rom.5:20). It is not found in the classic writers; and is a word which Paul obviously means to super-abound over, to super-abound greatly or outstandingly. It is a word which would only be used when the heart was full, and when it would be difficult to find words to express its feelings. Paul's heart was full of joy; and he pours forth his feelings in the most fervid and glowing language. Paul simply means that he has joy which cannot be expressed, joy unspeakable and full of glory (1 Pet.1:8).
In all our tribulation . . . (2 Cor.1:4; 6:4-5; 7:5)
.

Paul Rejoiced in Their Sorrowing to Repentance (2 Cor.7:5-11)

2 Cor.7:5 For, when we were come into Macedonia, our flesh had no rest, but we were troubled on every side; without were fightings, within were fears. (KJV)

For, when we were come into Macedonia . . . for the reasons why Paul went to Macedonia (2 Cor.1:16; 2:12-13).
Our flesh had no rest . . . we were very troubled and disturbed. We had no rest. The causes of his distress he quickly states.
But we were troubled on every side . . . in every way. We had no rest, but were forced to enter into trying labors and strifes there, and we were full of anxiety concerning you.
Without were fightings . . . this probably refers to fierce opposition, which Paul met with in his work of preaching the Gospel. He met there, as he did everywhere, opposition from pagans, Jews, and false brethren. Tumults were usually started wherever he went; and he preached the Gospel usually in the midst of violent opposition.
Within were fears . . .this probably refers to the worry he had in regard to the success of the Letter which he had sent to the church at Corinth. Fightings and fears (Deut.32:25).
This verse is connected with (2 Cor.2:12-13).

2 Cor.7:6 Nevertheless God, that comforteth those that are cast down, comforted us by the coming of Titus; (KJV)

Nevertheless God, that comforteth those that are cast down . . . God’s character is, that He gives comfort to those who are anxious and depressed. All Paul’s comfort was from God; and by whatever instrument that comfort was administered, Paul regarded and acknowledged God as the Author (2 Cor.1:4).
Comforted us by the coming of Titus . . . to Macedonia. Paul rejoiced not only in seeing Titus again, but especially in the message that he brought about the success of his Letter, and the conduct of the church at Corinth (2 Cor.2:13).

2 Cor.7:7 And not by his coming only, but by the consolation wherewith he was comforted in you, when he told us your earnest desire, your mourning, your fervent mind toward me; so that I rejoiced the more. (KJV)

And not by his coming only . . . not just by the fact that Titus was restored to Paul, and that his worry about him was now gone. It is clear that Paul, not having met with Titus as he had expected, at Troas, had felt much anxiety, perhaps thinking that he was sick, or that he had died.
But by the consolation wherewith he was comforted in you . . . Paul tells the Corinthians that Titus was satisfied and delighted with his interview with you. Titus had been treated kindly, and he had seen the effect produced by the letter which Paul wanted. He had been greatly comforted by Titus’ visit to Corinth; and this was a source of additional joy and comfort to Paul. He rejoiced at what he had witnessed among you, and he also imparted the same joy to me. The joy of one friend will transfer itself through the heart of another. Joy spreads! One Christian cannot be happy without making others happy with him.
When he told us your earnest desire . . . either to correct what was wrong, or to see me. It seems it was their desire, to comply with Paul’s commands, and to reform the abuses which existed in the church, and which had given him so much pain.
Your mourning . . . produced by the Letter. The deep repentance over the sins which had prevailed in the church.
Your fervent mind toward me . . . your zeal for me. Fervent mind (2 Cor.7:11; Jn.2:17). It means that they displayed great love and attachment to Paul, and an earnest desire to comply with his wishes.
So that I rejoiced the more . . . I not only rejoiced at Titus coming, but I rejoiced all the more at what he told me about you. Under any circumstances the coming of Titus would have been an occasion of joy; but it was especially so from the account which he gave me of you.

2 Cor.7:8 For though I made you sorry with a letter, I do not repent, though I did repent: for I perceive that the same epistle hath made you sorry, though it were but for a season. (KJV)

For though I made you sorry with a letter . . . meaning the first Letter that Paul had sent to the Corinthians. In that Letter, Paul felt it necessary to rebuke them for their disagreements, their oppositions and other disorders which had occurred, and which were wrongly tolerated in the church. That Letter was tailored to produce pain in them . . . as severe and just reproof always does! Paul felt very anxious about its effect on them. It was painful to him to write it, and he was well aware that it would cause deep distress among them to be thus reproved.
I do not repent . . . I am not sorry, because I have seen such happy effects produced by it; it has so completely answered the end which I had in mind. It was so kindly received, that I do not regret now that I wrote it. It gives me no pain to recall it, but I rejoice that I wrote it.
Though I did repent . . . repent here does not mean repentance in the sense in which that word is commonly understood, as if any wrong had been done. It is not the language of remorse. I think it means an uneasiness which a good man feels, not from the consciousness of having done wrong, but from a tenderness for others, and a fear lest that which, prompted by duty, he had said, should have too strong an effect upon them.
For I perceive that the same epistle hath made you sorry, though it were but for a season  . . . I perceive (see) that it produced the kind of sorrow in you which I wanted. I see that it has produced permanent good results. The sorrow, which the Letter caused in you was only for a short time, but the good effects will continue. Paul says that he had great reason to rejoice in that he had sent the Letter, because it produced permanent repentance and reformation (verse 9), and it had accomplished all that he desired. For I perceive . . . this explains I did repent or I regret it, and is parenthetical (added info), for I perceive that the same epistle did make you sorry, though it was but for a season.

2 Cor.7:9 Now I rejoice, not that ye were made sorry, but that ye sorrowed to repentance: for ye were made sorry after a godly manner, that ye might receive damage by us in nothing. (KJV)
Now I rejoice, not that ye were made sorry . . . Paul had no pleasure in giving pain to any one, or in seeing the distress of any. When people are brought to repentance under the preaching of the Gospel, the ministers of the Gospel find no pleasure in their grief, but it is a grief that is necessary to bring them to the knowledge of what repentance can bring their way. Many times a preacher can bring deep distress to the mind which is produced by their preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ. This grief, this sorrow is often an indication of their return to God, and will be followed by happiness and by the fruits of good living. God many times chastises or rebukes us by the Gospel, and it need not be a preacher who brings that blessed Word!
But that ye sorrowed to repentance . . . it was not just grief; it was not just sorrow producing gloom, despair or sadness, it was not sorrow that led you to be angry at him who had rebuked you for your errors . . . as is sometimes the case with the sorrow that is produced by criticism; but it was a sorrow that led to a change and restoration. It was a sorrow that was followed by a putting away of the evil for the existence of which there had been reason to rebuke you. The word repentance is a different word from that which, in verse 8, is rendered, I did repent, and indicates a different state of mind. It properly means a change of mind or purpose (Heb.12:17). It means a change for the better; a change of mind that is durable and productive in its results; a change that will bring about a permanent restoration. It was such a deep sorrow for their sin that leads to reformation, a deep sorrow for their disobedience to God, and their willingness to put away, cast off the evils which had existed among them (Rom.13:12; Eph.4:22; Col.3:8-9; Jam.1:21;1 Pet.2:1). It was this fact, and not that they had been made sorry, that led Paul to rejoice.
After a godly manner . . . accurately, according to God, meaning that your sorrow must have respect to God, and bring your mind in agreement and harmony to God (Rom.13:22; 1 Pet.4:6).
That ye might receive damage by us in nothing . . . receive damage properly means to bring loss upon any one; to receive loss or damage (1 Cor.3:15; Phil3:8). Paul says: You were indeed put to pain and grief by my rebuke. You did have sorrow, but it has done you no permanent injury.  It has been a great benefit to you. IF you had not repented, if you had been pained without putting away the sins for which the reproof was administered; IF it had just been grief without any proper fruit following, you might have given me a reason to inflict a more severe discipline. But now you have gained happiness by all the sorrow which I have caused. Sinners really do gain happiness in the end, by all the pain of repentance produced by the preaching of the Gospel. NO one suffers loss, simply by being told of his faults . . . BUT if a person repents under the duties to those faithful ministers and other friends who tell them of their errors, they find happiness and joy in the Lord once again! God is SO good! Thank You Jesus!

2 Cor.7:10 For godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of: but the sorrow of the world worketh death. (KJV)

For Godly sorrow . . . Godly sorrow is accordance to God, in agreement with Him, in perfect harmony with Him. My friend, the Gospel is commanded by Him, for it is sorrow for our own sins (Mat.5:4), or others' sins, or sorrow for the judgments of God, as they are the indications of God's wrath and His hot displeasure for sin (Ps.2:5; 6:1; 38:1). Godly sorrow is the God of grace working in the soul, and touching the heart by His Spirit (Rom.8:27; 2 Cor.3:3; 1 Pet.1:22). Godly sorrow, whose end is the honor and glory of God, in the restoration of the person sorrowing, and also a hatred of sin, and a sincere will to turn from it.
Worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of . . . Godly sorrow is NOT repentance, but it produces the change of heart and life which IS repentance. Not to be repented of . . . (verse 8), not to be regretted. It is permanent and abiding. There is never a reason to mourn over such wonderful repentance and change of life, that results in their eternal salvation.
But the sorrow of the world worketh death . . . all sorrow, except Godly sorrow is simply the sorrow of the world, the effect of which is often natural death. Any sorrow which is not toward God, and which does not come from right views of sin as committed against God, are sorrows of the world. Maybe Paul refers here to the sorrow which arises from worldly causes, and which does not lead to God for comfort. Such may be the sorrow which arises from the loss of friends or property; from disappointment, or from shame and disgrace. Worketh death . . . has a tendency to lead to death, spiritual, temporal, and eternal. It does not lead to life.
Different deaths:  http://www.hisservants.org/death_then_what_1.1.htm

Worldly sorrow:
#1. Produces anguish, distress and suffering only. It brings NO comfort.
#2. It has the tendency to break the spirit, to destroy peace, and to mar happiness.
#3. It often leads to death itself. The spirit is broken, and the heart pines away under the influence of the constant sorrow; or men often and take their lives.
#4. It leads to eternal death (2 Thes.1:8-9; Rev.20:15). There is no looking to God; no looking for pardon. Worldly sorrow produces murmuring, repining, complaining, fretfulness against God, and leads to His utter displeasure, and to the condemnation and ruin of the soul.

Eternal death is ETERNAL SEPAR ATION from God and all His goodness and mercy.
2 Thessalonians 1:8-9 In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ: 9 Who shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of his power; (KJV)
Revelation 20:15 And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire. (KJV)

OTHER Scriptures on Eternal Death:
Isa.1:31; 33:14; 34:10; 66:24; Dan.7:11; 12:1-2; Mal.4:1; Mat.3:12; 13:30,42; 18:8; 25:41; 9:44; Luke 3:9,17; 16:24; Heb.6:8; Jude 1:7; Rev.14:10; 19:20; 20:10; 21:8.

Three kinds of sorrow in 2 Cor.7:8-10.
#1. Paul's regret, as he wondered whether he had made a mistake by being too severe in his letter (2 Cor.7:8)
#2. Godly sorrow that works repentance to salvation, changes the life and cleanses it from sin (2 Cor.7:8-10)
#3. Sorrow of the world that works death (2 Cor.7:10). This is unrepentant sorrow or pain over lost goods, lost friends, lack of pleasure and partial reaping of what has been sowed

Examples of sorrow:
#1. Cain in punishment (Gen.4:13-14)
#2. Hagar in homelessness (Gen.21:17)
#3. Israel in bondage (Ex.3:7-10)
#4. Jacob for Joseph (Gen.37:34-35)
#5. Jacob for Benjamin (Gen.43:14)
#6. Hannah in barrenness (1 Sma.1:15)
#7. Saul when rejected (1 Sam.15:24,30)
#8. David for Absalom (2 Sam.18:33-2 Sam.19:9)
#9. Mary and Martha (Jn.11:19-40)
#10. Jesus (Isa.53:3; Mat.26:37-44)
#11. Judas in betrayal (Mat.27:3-5)
#12. The Corinthians (2 Cor.7:8-12)

2 Cor.7:11 For behold this selfsame thing, that ye sorrowed after a godly sort, what carefulness it wrought in you, yea, what clearing of yourselves, yea, what indignation, yea, what fear, yea, what vehement desire, yea, what zeal, yea, what revenge! In all things ye have approved yourselves to be clear in this matter. (KJV)
For behold this self-same thing, that ye sorrowed after a godly sort . . . as you have seen in your own case, the happy effects of godly sorrow. The purpose of Paul is to show the effects of godly sorrow, to which he had referred to in verse 10. He appeals to their own case, and says that it was beautifully illustrated among them.
What carefulness it wrought in you . . . carefulness properly means speed, haste; then persistence, earnest effort, boldness. Here it is clearly used to mean the diligence and the great concern which they displayed to remove the evils which existed among them. They went right to work to remove them. They did not just sit down to mourn over them, nor did they wait for God to remove them, nor did they plead that there was nothing to do; but they set about the work as though they believed it would be done. When someone is thoroughly convinced of sin, they will set about removing it with the utmost diligence. They know that it must be done, or that the soul will suffer.
Yea, what clearing of yourselves . . . Paul praised the Corinthians for their right response to the correction he had given them. It is difficult to accept criticism, correction or rebuke with self-control and grace. It is much more natural to be defensive and then counterattack. We can accept criticism with self-pity, thinking we do not really deserve it, or we can be angry and resentful. But a TRUE Christian should graciously accept constructive and helpful criticism, honestly evaluate it, and grow from it.
Yea, what indignation . . .  indignation, anger against the sin, and perhaps against the persons who had drawn down the criticism of the apostle Paul. One effect of TRUE repentance is to produce an clear and obvious hatred of sin. It is NOT just regret, or sorrow; it is absolute hatred. There is a deep anger against it as a wicked and a bitter thing.
Yea, what fear . . . fear lest the thing should be repeated, fear that it would not be totally removed. Or it may mean fear of the displeasure of Paul, and of the punishment which would be inflicted if the evil were not removed. But it most likely refers to the anxious state of mind that the whole evil might be corrected, and to the dread of having any trace of evil remaining among them.
Yea, what vehement desire . . . this may mean their ardent wish to remove the cause of complaint, or their anxious desire to see the apostle. It is used in the latter sense in verse 7, and according to some, that is the meaning here. It seems to me more likely that Paul refers to their anxious wish to remove the sin, since this is the topic under consideration. The point of his remarks in this verse is not so much their affection for him, as their anger against their sin, and their deep grief that sin had existed and had been tolerated among them.
Yea, what zeal . . . zeal, passion to remove the sin, and to show their attachment to Paul. They set about the work of restoration in a great way.
Yea, what revenge! . . . revenge properly means maintenance of right, protection; and it is used in the sense of vengeance; and then of severe retribution or punishment (Lk.21:22; 2 Thes.1:8-9; 1 Pet.2:14).
In all things . . . the sense of this is, you have cleared yourselves entirely of blame in this business. Paul does not mean that none of them had been to blame, or that the church had been free from fault, for a large part of his former Letter is busy in reproving them for their faults in this business; but he means that, by their zeal and their readiness to take away the cause of complaint, they had removed all need of further blame, and had pursued such a course as entirely to meet his approval. They had cleared themselves of any further blame and had become, so far as this was concerned, clear or pure.

Six Blessings of Godly Sorrow . . . it promotes:
#1. Working of carefulness and obedience
#2. Clearing of selves from guilt
#3. Indignation and hatred of sin
#4. Fear of God and of the result of sin
#5. Deep desire to make things right
#6. Passion to do the right thing

In the Comfort They and Titus Had Together (2 Cor.7:12-16)

2 Cor.7:12 Wherefore, though I wrote unto you, I did it not for his cause that had done the wrong, nor for his cause that suffered wrong, but that our care for you in the sight of God might appear unto you. (KJV)

Wherefore, though I wrote unto you . . . in this verse Paul states the main reason why he had written to them on the subject. It was not just because of the man that had abused his father's wife, not out of any particular hatred or ill-will he had to him; it was because of the tender anxiety for the whole church, and in order to show the deep interest which he had in their welfare.
I did it not for his cause that had done the wrong . . . . not mainly because of the incestuous person (1 Cor.5:1). It was not primarily with reference to him as an individual, but from a regard to the whole church.
Nor for his cause that suffered wrong . . . not just because of the wrong which he had suffered might be rectified, and that his rights might be restored, valuable and desirable as that was. The offence was that a man had taken his father's wife as his own, and the person injured, therefore, was his father. It seems from this Passage, that the father was living at the time when Paul wrote this Letter.
But that our care for you in the sight of God might appear unto you . . . I wrote mainly that I might show the deep interest which I had in the church as a whole, and that out of a love to your souls, and a care I had for you, that in all things you might do right by God. Even though I wrote that serious letter, it was not because of the one who did wrong or the one who was wronged. I wrote it to make plain to you, in God's eyes, how deep your devotion to us really is.

2 Cor.7:13 Therefore we were comforted in your comfort: yea, and exceedingly the more joyed we for the joy of Titus, because his spirit was refreshed by you all. (KJV)

Therefore we were comforted in your comfort. The phrase, your comfort, here seems to mean the happiness which they had, or might reasonably be expected to have, in obeying the directions of Paul, and in the repentance which they had manifested. Paul had spoken of no other consolation or comfort than this; and the idea seems to be, that they were a happy people, and would be happy by obeying the commands of God. This fact gave Paul additional joy; and he could not help but rejoice that they had removed the cause of the offence, and that they would not thus be exposed to the displeasure of God. Had they not repented and put away the evil, the results would have been deep distress. As it was, they would be blessed and happy.
Yea, and exceedingly the more joyed we for the joy of Titus, because his spirit was refreshed by you all . . . Titus had been very kindly received, and warmly welcomed, and he had become attached to them. This was to Paul an additional occasion of joy (verse 7).

2 Cor.7:14 For if I have boasted any thing to him of you, I am not ashamed; but as we spake all things to you in truth, even so our boasting, which I made before Titus, is found a truth. (KJV)

For if I have boasted any thing to him . . . Paul must have spoken most favorably to Titus of the Corinthians before he went there. He had probably expressed his belief that Titus would be kindly received; that they would be willing to listen to him, and to submit to the directions of Paul.
I am not ashamed . . . it has all turned out to be true. Titus has found it as I said it would be. All my expectations are realized; and you have been just as kind and friendly, and generous as I assured him you would be.
But as we spake all things to you in truth . . . everything that I said to you was said in truth. All my promises to you, and all my commands, and all my reasonable expectations expressed to you, were sincere. I spoke no lies, and all that I have said so far turned out to be true.
Even so our boasting, which I made before Titus, is found a truth . . . my boasting of your character, and of your nature to do right, which I made before Titus, has turned out to be true. It was as I said it would be. I did not praise you too highly to him, nor did I overstate the matter to you in my Letter.

2 Cor.7:15 And his inward affection is more abundant toward you, whilst he remembereth the obedience of you all, how with fear and trembling ye received him. (KJV)

And his inward affection is more abundant toward you . . . Titus has become deeply and tenderly attached to you. His affectionate regard for you has been greatly increased by his visit. The meaning of the word here rendered inward affection, bowels (2 Cor.6:12). It means here deep, tender attachment, or love.
Whilst he remembereth the obedience of you all, how with fear and trembling ye received him . . . with fear of offending, and with deep anxiety of the penalties of remaining in sin. He saw what a fear there was of doing wrong, and what evidence there was, therefore, that you were concerned about doing right.

2 Cor.7:16 I rejoice therefore that I have confidence in you in all things. (KJV)

I rejoice therefore that I have confidence in you in all things . . . Paul rejoiced, that he had confidence in them, He had ample proof that they were willing to obey God, and to put away everything that is offensive to Him. The address in this part of the Letter is perfect. It is designed, clearly, not just to praise them for what they had done, and to show them the deep attachment which he had for them, but in a special manner to prepare them for what he was about to say in the following chapter regarding the collection which he had so much at heart for the poor saints at Jerusalem. What Paul says here is well adapted to introduce that subject.
Paul has opened his heart and has shown his inmost feelings. He is full of joy and rejoicing. He has been comforted. This chapter has shown God's comfort in the heart of Paul.

Six conditions of the Promises
#1. Be not unequally yoked with unbelievers (2 Cor.6:14-16).
#2. Come out from among them (2 Cor.6:17).
#3. Be separate from them (2 Cor.6:17).
#4. Touch not the unclean thing (2 Cor.6:17).
#5. Cleanse self of all filthiness of the flesh and spirit (2 Cor.7:1; Mk.7:19-21; Rom.1:18-32; 1 Cor.6:9-11; Gal.5:19-21; Col.3:5-10).
#6. Perfect holiness in the fear of God (2 Cor.7:1; Eph.1:4; 4:24; Gal.5:24; Rom.6:14-23; 8:1-13; Heb12:12-15).

Three kinds of sorrow in 2 Cor.7:8-10.
#1. Paul's regret, as he wondered whether he had made a mistake by being too severe in his letter (2 Cor.7:8)
#2. Godly sorrow that works repentance to salvation, changes the life and cleanses it from sin (2 Cor.7:8-10)
#3. Sorrow of the world that works death (2 Cor.7:10). This is unrepentant sorrow or pain over lost goods, lost friends, lack of pleasure and partial reaping of what has been sowed

Examples of sorrow:
#1. Cain in punishment (Gen.4:13-14)
#2. Hagar in homelessness (Gen.21:17)
#3. Israel in bondage (Ex.3:7-10)
#4. Jacob for Joseph (Gen.37:34-35)
#5. Jacob for Benjamin (Gen.43:14)
#6. Hannah in barrenness (1 Sma.1:15)
#7. Saul when rejected (1 Sam.15:24,30)
#8. David for Absalom (2 Sam.18:33-2 Sam.19:9)
#9. Mary and Martha (Jn.11:19-40)
#10. Jesus (Isa.53:3; Mat.26:37-44)
#11. Judas in betrayal (Mat.27:3-5)
#12. The Corinthians (2 Cor.7:8-12)

Six Blessings of Godly Sorrow . . . it promotes:
#1. Working of carefulness and obedience
#2. Clearing of selves from guilt
#3. Indignation and hatred of sin
#4. Fear of God and of the result of sin
#5. Deep desire to make things right
#6. Passion to do the right thing

Worldly sorrow:
#1. Produces anguish, distress and suffering only. It brings NO comfort.
#2. It has the tendency to break the spirit, to destroy peace, and to mar happiness.
#3. It often leads to death itself. The spirit is broken, and the heart pines away under the influence of the constant sorrow; or men often and take their lives.
#4. It leads to eternal death (2 Thes.1:8-9; Rev.20:15). There is no looking to God; no looking for pardon. Worldly sorrow produces murmuring, repining, complaining, fretfulness against God, and leads to His utter displeasure, and to the condemnation and ruin of the soul.

Eternal death is ETERNAL SEPAR ATION from God and all His goodness and mercy.
2 Thessalonians 1:8-9 In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ: 9 Who shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of his power; (KJV)
Revelation 20:15 And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire. (KJV)

OTHER Scriptures on Eternal Death:
Isa.1:31; 33:14; 34:10; 66:24; Dan.7:11; 12:1-2; Mal.4:1; Mat.3:12; 13:30,42; 18:8; 25:41; 9:44; Luke 3:9,17; 16:24; Heb.6:8; Jude 1:7; Rev.14:10; 19:20; 20:10; 21:8.

2 Corinthians

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